Much of the power amp’s weight comes from its (2) two 1200VA transformers and, again, no global feedback is used in the amplification stages. As per the Bellini Anniversary, the circuitry is fully balanced and similar through-hole, military and audio-grade components are used throughout.

In many ways, this duo is exceptional.

The first thing likely to strike you is the remarkable midband lucidity, and the expansiveness of the soundstage.

These amps have an uncanny ability to place both instruments and vocalists in their own space without the presentation as a whole feeling crowded or compressed.

What’s more, a virtual absence of background noise means that central performers stand out in stark relief, apparently on an otherwise empty stage, with musical accompaniment arranged carefully behind them.

This Anniversary pre/power also serves up an impeccable performance when it comes to the top-end - the sheer level of clarity and purity in the treble region is again, first-class, enabling you to hear the tinkle of a pin drop in even the busiest of mixes.

Cymbals in general possessed a delicious metallic sheen while more vigorous strikes on the metalwork arrived with real force before shimmering away into the distance. Equally, delicately struck hi-hats were as vivid-sounding as I have heard them, and not once did they disappear into the back of the mix.
Naturally, with the available power on tap from the Donizetti Anniversary, bass was prodigiously extended, solid and taut. Even better, it remained composed even with the amp wound up to thoroughly anti-social levels.

Where the Audio Analogue duo definitely came out on top was with its handling of recordings that varied in their quality. The Corrs’ ‘Only When I Sleep’ from their 1997 album Talk On Corners [Atlantic Recordings 7567-83051-2] is something of a sonic mess, sounding steely at best and clearly mixed to make it radio-friendly. Yet never have I heard it sound better than when played via the Bellini and Donizetti Anniversary pre/power. The amps simply cut through the nastiness, managing to impart a sense of order to the proceedings and even bring a hint of purity to the ragged top end.

The Audio Analogue Bellini & Donizetti Anniversary offer a combination of magnificent sound quality with a brute-force styling that I thoroughly enjoyed. They typically make a great job of poor recordings, too.



 
The rarity here is that the AAdac doesn’t flatten the life out of good recordings in the hope of making the bad ones less vexatious. Play something remarkably well recorded. However, specifically, try something like Convergence by Malia and Boris Blank [Boutique] – and you hear a rich, detailed and extremely spacious sound, with a remarkable coherence and vocal articulation. Convergence is a very ‘expansive’ sounding recording, and it can quickly become overblown and exaggerated sounding, but the AAdac plays with a near-perfect balance.

However, the combination of that refinement and spatial qualities of the AAdac does lend itself toward more naturally recorded live, acoustic instruments, which often means jazz, folk or classical music. It’s not too mellow when playing rock, and does give rock both energy and intensity it needs, but the AAdac remains at its best when making an expansive, expressive sound.

As such, I think the AAdrive and AAdac are both something of a high-end star combination in the making. They deserve to be at the front end of some extremely high-grade audio.
The Audio Analogue AAdac immediately floods my listening room with pleasant sound. A shot of warmth, lush timbres and a wonderful liveliness - a sound that is often described as "analog".
The double bass line ("Take Five") stoically played by Eugene Wright carries the piece forward with ease. The AAdac brings the instrument across substantially. I almost feel that the large resonance body is present in the room.

The subject of the alto saxophone is still open - and that brings us to the mid-range. And yes, yes, yes - the Audio Analogue AAdac can tones like only a few. The AAdac leaves no trace of a doubt with the haunting saxophone on “Take Five”. It's clear, haunting, confident and incredible fun to listen to. I got full marks for this performance.
Even with voices, the Audio Analogue Pure AAdac does its best. Strong soul voices, such as Cassandra Wilson (Album: Coming Forth By Day), get under the skin immediately.

I switch to piano music. I recently rediscovered Bach's Goldberg Variations - of course, the interpretations of Glenn Gould. Although the AAdac does an excellent job in terms of resolution and fine dynamics and lets me hear Gould's playing in all subtle details, it draws my attention primarily to the melody lines. I find it difficult not to let myself be carried away by the musical flow and to listen to the playing technique.

The treble also corresponds to this character. It is definitely there, very nicely dissolved and free, but doesn’t make a fuss, but is always pleasing, silky, beautiful. How the Italians manage to hear the cymbal attacks that Eva Cassidy's drummer did on the album Live at Blues Alley ( on Amazon) runs at times, sounding radiantly intense and velvety soft at the same time, is a mystery to me.
--- Designed & handcrafted in Italy ---
Click product Name for link to full review
Review Excerpts
--- Maestro Anniversary Dual-Mono Integrated Amplifier ---
"It was able to power the relatively inefficient Kharma Elegance dB7-S speakers with no problem whatsoever, with massive macro-dynamics swings, very powerful pitch stable and bottomless sounding bass, and at the same time could draw me into the music with whisperingly small shifts in microdynamics, and sparkling, detailed, and agile upper treble."

"This amp easily reproduced Van Morrison's distinctive voice (on "Astral Weeks"), to the point where I could easily imagine in my mind's ear him standing in front of the microphone in a padded sound booth in the studio."

"More importantly, the Maestro Anniversary sounded as transparent as any amplifier I've ever had in this system. It also acted as an as an almost perfect attenuator rather than an amplifier."
--- AA DAC ---
After living with this converter and listening to it daily, I found that its major sonic feature of the aaDAC converter was its level of transparency to the source. Depending on which system it was used in, there were times when it was practically aurally invisible, inviting me to listen to any genre of music I chose.

Through the Audio Analogue aaDAC the sounds of every instrument and voice were made as separate as possible depending on the track and also spread out in a huge soundstage. Whether I was playing the physical SACD (Rolling Stones Beggars Banquet) or the file on my music server, the sound was just as good, letting me close my eyes and imagine I was a fly on the wall in that London studio.

The midrange was so transparent that it often made me feel as if in the audio chain there was no converter at all, and all I was left with was the music. Again, it was the mega-transparency of this converter, its midrange letting me hear not only what has been recorded, but somehow transposed into the real thing coming through my speakers and into my listening room.
THE SOUND
The great strength of the Audio Analogue set Anniversary resides in its analytical capacity. It isolates each instrument, each voice and each in an ultra realistic sound scene on several levels.

More than different layers of information, the Audio Analogue set places each instrument precisely in space in the three dimensions. He treats each instrument with a real sensation of matter, thickness and sound volume. Readability is thus maximum with instruments coming to life in the listening room.

Speed is another advantage of Bellini and Donizetti. Small percussions and snaps of the finger are restored with a pin and a prick nuances contributing to their realism. On the saxophone, the harmonica or the violin, we take advantage of an impressive respect for timbre/tonality. We feel all the complexity and the material of the instrument, the sounds of mouth. Again, the instruments take shape before us, perfectly separated from each other.

OUR CONCLUSION
Give them excellent recordings and the Audio Analogue Bellini and Donizetti will make the most of it. These devices play on complexity to extract each detail and recreate a sound scene with a width, height and depth of realism.

The Bellini and Donizetti form a high-end analog unit capable of bringing the music in its smallest nuances, from the bottom to the top of the spectrum, with a sensation of confounding presence of realism

More Audio Analogue Reviews: https://www.audioanalogue.com/en/press
Maestro Anniversary Dual-Mono Integrated Amplifier
The sound is simply packed with detail, but even with the powerful drumming the Maestro keeps things tight and clean while still offering chest-thumping bass. This precision and definition, while still maintaining scale and weight, is also very much in evidence with the epic Rolling Stones In Mono box-set, where the sheer punch of familiar tracks shorn of later stereo fripperies demonstrates the speed and dynamics of prime period Stones. ‘It’s All Over Now’ just explodes out of the speakers and keeps on giving, the tambourine punching through the mix and every element of the performance wonderfully clear, while the more laconic ‘Time Is On My Side’ also has that real‘band in the room’ effect."
"The Maestro Anniversary manages to bring music to life, to play loud without strain, to drive speakers hard and with complete control, with fantastic musical insight, even into the deepest bass notes. When music sounds this sweet, detailed, cohesive and fast with fantastic leading edge clarity and sound stage clarity its a joy to listen to, a joy that keeps pulling you back for more."
Maestro Anniversary Dual-Mono Integrated Amplifier

Donizetti Anniversary Amplifier + Bellini Anniversary Linestage
Much of the power amp’s weight comes from its (2) two 1200VA transformers and, again, no global feedback is used in the amplification stages. As per the Bellini Anniversary, the circuitry is fully balanced and similar through-hole, military and audio-grade components are used throughout.

In many ways, this duo is exceptional.

The first thing likely to strike you is the remarkable midband lucidity, and the expansiveness of the soundstage.

These amps have an uncanny ability to place both instruments and vocalists in their own space without the presentation as a whole feeling crowded or compressed.

What’s more, a virtual absence of background noise means that central performers stand out in stark relief, apparently on an otherwise empty stage, with musical accompaniment arranged carefully behind them.

This Anniversary pre/power also serves up an impeccable performance when it comes to the top-end - the sheer level of clarity and purity in the treble region is again, first-class, enabling you to hear the tinkle of a pin drop in even the busiest of mixes.

Cymbals in general possessed a delicious metallic sheen while more vigorous strikes on the metalwork arrived with real force before shimmering away into the distance. Equally, delicately struck hi-hats were as vivid-sounding as I have heard them, and not once did they disappear into the back of the mix.
Naturally, with the available power on tap from the Donizetti Anniversary, bass was prodigiously extended, solid and taut. Even better, it remained composed even with the amp wound up to thoroughly anti-social levels.

Where the Audio Analogue duo definitely came out on top was with its handling of recordings that varied in their quality. The Corrs’ ‘Only When I Sleep’ from their 1997 album Talk On Corners [Atlantic Recordings 7567-83051-2] is something of a sonic mess, sounding steely at best and clearly mixed to make it radio-friendly. Yet never have I heard it sound better than when played via the Bellini and Donizetti Anniversary pre/power. The amps simply cut through the nastiness, managing to impart a sense of order to the proceedings and even bring a hint of purity to the ragged top end.

The Audio Analogue Bellini & Donizetti Anniversary offer a combination of magnificent sound quality with a brute-force styling that I thoroughly enjoyed. They typically make a great job of poor recordings, too.
tmh audio
Email: info@tmhaudio.com
Tel: 937-439-2667